Skip to main content
National Parks.

Alaska, Colorado, Virginia, Wyoming, Carolina del Sur, California, Utah, Washington, Florida

20 vistas increíbles que encontrarás en los Parques Nacionales de EE. UU.

Por: Hal Amen

1 of 1
  • States:
    Alaska
    Colorado
    Virginia
    Wyoming
    Carolina del Sur
    California
    Utah
    Washington
    Florida

Si visitaras los 59 parques nacionales de Estados Unidos, podrías comprender a plenitud la geología y la ecología de nuestro planeta

Los estadounidenses y aquellos que visitan Estados Unidos desde otros lugares tienen acceso a 59 parques nacionales diferentes, cuyas características y oportunidades en conjunto son más diversas que las que cualquier otra parte en el mundo. Desde los glaciales picos de Brooks Range en Gates of the Artic, hasta los pantanos subtropicales en los Everglades de Florida. Desde el calor húmedo por debajo del nivel del mar en el Valle de la Muerte en California, hasta la niebla que se levanta de la cima de las montañas en Shenandoah, en Virginia. Glaciares y manglares, cascadas, cañones y bosques encumbrados: si visitaras los 59 parques nacionales de Estados Unidos, podrías comprender a plenitud la geología y la ecología de nuestro planeta. Muchos de estos nombres de parques te deben resultar conocidos. Quizás sea la primera vez que escuches hablar de algunos otros. Pero no importa si reciben a 10 millones de visitantes cada año, como es el caso de Great Smoky, o si apenas reciben 1000 como en Kobuk Valley, vale la pena viajar por todos ellos. He aquí un poco de inspiración para que empieces a planificar.

Parque Nacional Wrangell-St. Elias

Many of these park names may be familiar to you. Some you may be hearing for the first time. But whether they see 10 million annual visitors (Great Smoky) or barely a 1,000 (Kobuk Valley), all are worth a trip. Here’s some inspiration to get you planning. Wrangell–St. Elias National Park

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park

NPS Photo - Neal Herbert

Aerial Photo from Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve

The largest park in the country, Wrangell-St. Elias lies in a corner of southern Alaska, adjacent to the Yukon's Kluane National Park just over the border. Its 20,000 square miles make for a whole lot of potential exploration; pictured above is a hiker on the Skookum Volcano Trail.

Canyonlands National Park

John Fowler

Canyonlands National Park

Just south of Moab and the more recognized Arches National Park, Canyonlands also features some impressive sandstone arch formations, as well as canyons of monumental scale, carved by the Colorado and Green Rivers.

Shenandoah National Park

Josh Grenier

Shenandoah National Park

Encompassing a long strip of both the Blue Ridge Mountains and adjacent Shenandoah River Valley, this Virginia national park gets super popular during the fall, when leaf peepers arrive to complete the 105-mile Skyline Drive.

Yellowstone National Park

The world's first national park is also one of its most unique and well visited. The 3,400 square miles of Yellowstone hold geysers, mountain lakes, forests, river canyons, waterfalls, and many threatened species. Above is an aerial shot of the Grand Prismatic Spring, the third-largest hot spring in the world.

Congaree National Park

Congaree National Park

I had honestly never heard of this park prior to researching this piece, but after reading up, I totally want to go. Congaree protects a vast tract of marshy hardwood forest along the river of the same name just southeast of Columbia, South Carolina. Its old-growth cypress trees are some of the tallest in the American East.

Death Valley National Park

Death Valley National Park

Low and hot—Death Valley is home to both the lowest elevations and hottest temperatures in the US. But the landscape in this part of California is actually incredibly diverse, ranging from saltpans like the Devil's Racetrack, pictured above, to snow-capped mountains reaching 11,000ft.

Bryce Canyon National Park

Bruce Canyon National Park

Bryce sits in southern Utah and features a massive collection of natural amphitheaters covered in rock formations known as hoodoos.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Great Smoky is surrounded by kitschy tourist towns and is the most visited national park, thanks to its location near the East Coast and free admission. Still, once you're there, you can see scenes like this.

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park

Named for the largest of its three signature peaks, Grand Teton National Park also contains lakes, forest, and a section of the Snake River. It sits just south of Yellowstone in western Wyoming, and together they represent one of the largest protected ecosystems in the world.

Olympic National Park

Covering nearly a million acres on the peninsula of the same name in northwestern Washington, the terrain of this park is super variable, ranging from Pacific coastline to alpine peaks to temperate rainforest.

Great Sand Dunes National Park

Great Sand Dunes National Park

One of the country's newest national parks (designated in 2004), Great Sand Dunes lies in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado. Featuring the tallest sand dunes on the continent, backed by multiple 13,000ft mountains, this is also one of the few places in the country where you can try sandboarding.

Yosemite National Park

Yosemite National Park

The central draw of Yosemite is the 7-square-mile valley of the same name, with its glacially carved peaks, sequoia groves, and spectacular waterfalls. To beat the crowds, get out and explore some of the other areas in this massive park in the Eastern Sierras.

Arches National Park

This aptly named park in eastern Utah, just north of Moab, is home to some 2,000 sandstone arches that come in all shapes and sizes. Above is one of the most photographed, Delicate Arch.

Glacier Bay National Park

Glacier Bay National Park

There are no roads leading to this park in southeastern Alaska, so your choices for getting there are: by raft via the Tatshenshini and Alsek Rivers (from Canada), by plane (usually out of Juneau), or, most commonly, by cruise ship.

Kings Canyon National Park

Kings Canyon National Park

Like Sequoia National Park next door, Kings Canyon is home to some seriously massive trees. Seen above is a stout ponderosa pine on the Bubbs Creek Trail.

Big Bend National Park

Expansive desert plains, 7,800ft mountains, and high Rio Grande canyons (Santa Elena Canyon shown above) define Big Bend National Park in western Texas. It's also distinguished as an International Dark Sky Park, marking it a great place for stargazing.

Denali National Park

Denali National Park

As far as views from the visitor center go, this one is pretty spectacular. The 6 million acres of Denali, in central Alaska, include the highest section of the Alaska Range (with the peak that gives the park its name), glaciers, river valleys, and abundant wildlife such as grizzly bears, caribou, gray wolves, golden eagles, wolverines, and Dall sheep.

Everglades National Park

Jupiterimages

Aerial view of Florida Everglades

Preserving one of the most significant wetland ecosystems anywhere in the world, southern Florida's Everglades protect rare species such as the Florida panther and American crocodile. The water in the park is actually an enormous river that runs from Lake Okeechobee to Florida Bay at a speed of about a quarter mile per day.

Gates of the Arctic National Park

NPS Photo

Remote river in Gates of the Arctic

As its name suggests, this is the northernmost park in the US, and is also one of the largest. Its predominant geographic feature is the Brooks Range. With zero road access, you have to hike or fly in, but once there, you've got pretty much an endless list of wilderness hiking and camping options.

Grand Canyon National Park

For the past several million years, the Colorado River has been slowly but steadily grinding its way through the rock of the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona. Reaching a width of 18 miles and a depth of 6,000 feet, the Grand Canyon is on a scale of few other places on Earth.

Parque Nacional Wrangell-St. Elias

Parque Nacional Wrangell-St. Elias
Ver más
National Parks Service/Neal Herbert

Parque Nacional Canyonlands

Al sur de Moab y del más conocido Parque Nacional Arches, Canyonlands exhibe algunas impresionantes formaciones de arenisca a manera de arco, así como cañones de monumental tamaño esculpidos por los ríos Colorado y Green.

Parque Nacional Canyonlands

Parque Nacional Canyonlands
Ver más
John Fowler

Parque Nacional Shenandoah

Este parque nacional de Virginia, que abarca una larga franja de las Blue Ridge Mountains y del Shenandoah River Valley, se vuelve muy popular durante el otoño, cuando llegan los admiradores de follaje para completar los 170 kilómetros de la Skyline Drive.

Parque Nacional Shenandoah

Parque Nacional Shenandoah
Ver más
Josh Grenier

Parque Nacional Yellowstone

El primer parque nacional del mundo también es uno de los parques más singulares y visitados. Los 8805 kilómetros cuadrados de Yellowstone contienen géiseres, lagos de montaña, bosques, cañones de ríos, cascadas y muchas especies amenazadas. La de arriba es una toma aérea de la Grand Prismatic Spring, o gran fuente prismática, la tercera fuente de aguas termales más grande del mundo.

Parque Nacional Congaree

Sinceramente, nunca había oído hablar de este parque antes de investigar para este artículo, pero después de lo que he leído, me muero de ganas por ir a conocerlo. Congaree protege un extenso trecho de bosques pantanosos de madera dura a lo largo del río del mismo nombre, al sudeste de Columbia, Carolina del Sur. Sus antiguos árboles de cipreses son algunos de los más altos en el este de Estados Unidos.

Parque Nacional Congaree

Parque Nacional Congaree
Ver más

Parque Nacional Death Valley

Bajo y caliente,Death Valley es la sede de las altitudes más bajas y de las temperaturas más calientes en EE. UU. Pero el paisaje en esta parte de California es increíblemente diverso, varía desde lagos secos como el Devil's Racetrack, que vemos arriba, hasta montañas cubiertas de nieve que alcanzan los 3,35 km.

Parque Nacional Death Valley

Parque Nacional Death Valley
Ver más

Parque Nacional Bryce Canyon

Bryce está ubicado al sur de Utah y presenta una enorme colección de anfiteatros naturales cubiertos de formaciones rocosas conocidas como hoodoos o chimeneas de hadas.

Parque Nacional Bryce Canyon

Parque Nacional Bryce Canyon
Ver más
Tobias Haase (paraflyer.de)

Parque Nacional Great Smoky Mountains

Great Smoky está rodeado de pueblos turistas kitsch y es el parque nacional más visitado, gracias a su ubicación cerca de la Costa Este y su entrada gratuita. Sin embargo, una vez allí, puedes ver escenas como esta.

Parque Nacional Great Smoky Mountains

Parque Nacional Great Smoky Mountains
Ver más

Parque Nacional Grand Teton

El Parque Nacional Grand Teton, que toma su nombre del más grande de sus tres picos emblemáticos, también posee lagos, bosques y una sección del río Snake. Está ubicado al sur de Yellowstone en el oeste de Wyoming y juntos representan uno de los ecosistemas protegidos más grandes del mundo.

Parque Nacional Grand Teton

Parque Nacional Grand Teton
Ver más

Parque Nacional Olympic

El terreno de este parque, que cubre casi 4046 kilómetros cuadrados en la península del mismo nombre al noroeste de Washington, es muy diverso, comprende desde costas en el Pacífico hasta picos alpinos y bosques lluviosos tropicales.

Parque Nacional y Reserva Great Sand Dunes

Great Sand Dunes es uno de los parques nacionales más nuevos (fue designado en 2004) y está ubicado en el Valle de San Luis al sur de Colorado. Con las dunas de arena más altas del continente respaldadas por múltiples montañas de 4 km de altura, este también es uno de los pocos lugares en el país en el que se puede practicar sandboarding.

Parque Nacional y Reserva Great Sand Dunes

Parque Nacional y Reserva Great Sand Dunes
Ver más

Parque Nacional Yosemite

La principal atracción de Yosemite es el valle de 18 kilómetros cuadrados que lleva el mismo nombre, con sus picos esculpidos por glaciares, sus bosques de secuoyas y sus espectaculares cascadas. Para alejarte de las multitudes, sal a explorar algunas de las otras áreas de este enorme parque en las Sierras del este.

Parque Nacional Yosemite

Parque Nacional Yosemite
Ver más

Parque Nacional Arches

Este parque con tan apropiado nombre, al este de Utah, apenas al norte de Moab, es la sede de unos 2000 arcos de arenisca de distintas formas y tamaños. El de arriba es uno de los más fotografiados, Delicate Arch.

Parque Nacional Glacier Bay

No hay carreteras que conduzcan a este parque en el sudeste de Alaska, así que, para llegar, puedes escoger entre practicar rafting por los ríos Tatshenshini y Alsek (desde Canadá), tomar un avión (normalmente, desde Juneau) o, lo más común, tomar un crucero.

Parque Nacional Glacier Bay

Parque Nacional Glacier Bay
Ver más

Parque Nacional Kings Canyon

Al igual que el vecino Parque Nacional Sequoia, Kings Canyon es el hogar de varios árboles inmensos. Arriba se puede apreciar un robusto pino ponderosa en el sendero Bubbs Creek Trail.

Parque Nacional Kings Canyon

Parque Nacional Kings Canyon
Ver más

Parque Nacional Big Bend

Las amplias llanuras desérticas, las montañas de 2,3 kilómetros y los altos cañones de Rio Grande (arriba se muestra el Santa Elena Canyon) definen el Parque Nacional Big Bend al oeste de Texas. Además, se le conoce como un International Dark Sky Park, lo que lo identifica como un lugar perfecto para observar las estrellas.

Parque Nacional Denali

Por lo que respecta a las vistas del centro de visitantes, esta es bastante impresionante. Los 24 281 kilómetros cuadrados de Denali, en el centro de Alaska, incluyen la sección más alta de la cordillera de Alaska (con el pico que le da el nombre al parque), los glaciares, los valles de ríos y una abundante variedad de animales salvajes, como osos grizzly, caribúes, lobos grises, águilas reales, glotones y muflones de Dall.

Parque Nacional Denali

Parque Nacional Denali
Ver más

Parque Nacional Everglades

Como reserva de uno de los más significativos ecosistemas de pantano del mundo, los Everglades al sur de la Florida protegen especies raras tales como la pantera de Florida y el cocodrilo americano. El agua del parque es en realidad un río enorme que corre desde el Lago Okeechobee a la Bahía de Florida, a una velocidad de cuatrocientos metros por día.

Parque Nacional Everglades

Parque Nacional Everglades
Ver más
Jupiter Images

Parque Nacional Gates of the Arctic

Tal como su nombre lo sugiere, este es el parque más al norte de EE. UU., y también es uno de los más grandes. Su principal característica geográfica es la cordillera Brooks Range. Sin carreteras de acceso, tienes que llegar a pie o en avión, pero una vez ahí, tienes una lista interminable de opciones para ir de excursión y acampar.

Parque Nacional Gates of the Arctic

Parque Nacional Gates of the Arctic
Ver más
National Parks Service

Parque Nacional Grand Canyon

Durante los últimos millones de años, el río Colorado ha esculpido lenta y progresivamente su camino a través de la roca de la meseta del Colorado, al norte de Arizona. Con un ancho de 29 kilómetros y una profundidad de 1,8 kilómetros, el Grand Canyon está en una escala que incluye a otros pocos lugares en la Tierra.

Explorar más